Shwetha Bhatia

Get to the triad before it gets you

September, 2017
The Master Responds

Prepping for any sport requires a great deal of proficiency. Engage yourself in an interesting read as Celebrity Nutritionist and Athlete, Shwetha Bhatia simplifies the female athlete triad and its effects on a woman's body.

India is a developing country and over the years there has been a noticeable increase in the number of females participating in sports. With its pros and cons, the so-called female athlete triad, a syndrome of eating disorders, is known to plague the health of sports-women the world over. But this disorder also seems to make a guest appearance in the lives of the nonathletic. The components of the illness put forth in the year 1997 by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), includes eating disorders, amenorrhea, and osteoporosis.

FEARS, SYMPTOMS AND THE TRIAD

A person with the disorder will most likely indulge in faulty eating habits. For example, a person may not eat out of fear of becoming fat; instead, h/she may make use of diet pills, laxatives or diuretics. A woman may suffer from menstrual dysfunction in which there is anovulation (absence of ovulation marked by low levels of estradiol and progesterone,) oligomenorrhea (greater than 35 days between cycles), and amenorrhea (absence of menstrual cycles lasting more than 3 months after menarche has occurred).The final component of the female athlete triad is bone health. Bone strength as we know it consists of BMD (or bone mineral content) and bone quality.



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